Dispatches

How do we include more people in the tech economy? Why does taking startup capital curse companies like Twitter? The assumptions that the age of extractive growth was built on are dying. What does the concept of the commons mean in the internet age? And how did early internet anti-government sentiment lead to corporate control of the internet?

The post 2 Dope Boys and a Podcast: Douglas Rushkoff and Throwing Rocks at the Google Bus appeared first on Rushkoff.

In this excerpt from the Team Human podcast, Maxwell talks about the impact our electronics have in the planet. It’s a topic Motherboard has explored a lot, and it’s an especially poignant one as the new iPhone comes out this week. By certain standards, it’s going to be the most environmentally friendly iPhone yet, I suspect. And yet, as as Maxwell points out, the most environmentally friendly phone is probably the one you’re holding right now.

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After Douglas Rushkoff wrote Throwing Rocks at the Google Bus, a book talking about how the digital economy can be reshaped so that everyone can prosper, he started getting dozens of emails a day asking practical questions—how to create a worker co-op, how to design an app that isn’t “extractive” of users, how to use technology in a way that doesn’t destroy the environment.

In a new podcast called Team Human, he gets into those details.

The post Douglas Rushkoff’s New Podcast Explores The Future Of Humans In A Digital World appeared first on Rushkoff.

I’m not a one-stop shop for new social and economic strategies. But I know a heck of a lot of the people who have the answers – people who understand we have to stop optimizing human lives for economic growth, and start optimizing the economy for human prosperity. People who want to stop programming people for technology, and start programming technology for people. The people I’ve come to call Team Human.

So I’m going back on the air with a new audio show – my first since doing The Media Squat on WFMU a decade ago. It’s a weekly podcast called Team Human.

The post Team Human: Our Last Best Hope for Peeps appeared first on Rushkoff.

In terms of regulating what we are referring to in this series as the sharing economy, Rushkoff believes that first and foremost, people and places need to have a seat at the table. “The city should be a shareholder in a company that’s using its infrastructure to run itself,” said Rushkoff. He believes we need to do a better job of requiring cooperation between parties that are incentivized differently. His advice to individuals? “Invest locally, if you can…Share with other people. Do ring on your neighbor’s doorbell, and say, ‘Do we both need to have snow blowers here? Can I use yours and you use my lawn mower?’ Create ways to actually cooperate. It sounds socialist, I’m sure it sounds really foreign, but the fewer lawn mowers we have, the less pollution we have.”

The post Reinvent: Bringing People and Places to the Table appeared first on Rushkoff.

I once saw a human lie detector perform at a conference – one of those guys who can call a dozen people up on stage and match them up with the objects that belong to them, or even “deduce ” their email passwords. He wasn’t doing magic, of course, but simply reading the cues and tells we all give one another all the time. As any gate investigator on Israel’s national airline knows – and its security record attests – our bodies give us away.

The post Digital Trends – No Secrets, No Shame: How Technology Forces Honesty appeared first on Rushkoff.

Most of us thought digital technology would connect the whole world in new ways. The Internet was supposed to break down those last boundaries between what are essentially synthetic nation states and herald a new, global community of peers.

National governments were considered extinct. Internet evangelist (and Grateful Dead lyricist) John Barlow dismissed them in his Declaration of Independence of Cyberspace 20 years ago: “I declare the global social space we are building to be naturally independent of the tyrannies you seek to impose on us.”

But the Internet age has actually heralded the opposite result. We are not advancing toward some new global society, but instead retreating back to nationalism. Instead of moving toward a colors of Benetton racial intermingling, we find many yearning for a fictional past when people like to think our races were distinct, and all was well.

The post The New Nationalism Of Brexit And Trump Is A Product Of The Digital Age appeared first on Rushkoff.

We think of automobiles as American as baseball, apple pie, and hotdogs – or at least that’s what the car advertisers have gotten us to believe.

But as the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration’s investigation into a fatal self-driving car accident should remind us, the automobile’s centrality to the American way of life was an expensive and political battle with nearly uncountable human casualties.

The post CNN – Tesla crash highlights real problem behind self-driving cars appeared first on Rushkoff.

The natural successor to philosopher of communication theory Marshall Mcluhan, Rushkoff was one of the first adopters of cyber culture but quickly saw how big business overturned the promise of the digital age in favour of making money. You’d be forgiven for mistaking Rushkoff for a pseudo Marxist rather than a media theorist. He uses words like “value extraction” and “scorched earth approach” and there is a lot of truth and heartfelt compassion in what Douglas has to say. His ability to cut through all the jargon of the tech age and say it as it is especially in his latest book, Throwing Rocks at the Google Bus, is refreshing. A punk and pioneer, Rushkoff comes at this hyper-capitalist sector with venom. He has been left heartbroken having originally thought that this tech explosion would bring us the fruits and spoils of open collaborations and more transparency. Nonetheless his fight goes on, Rushkoff opens up to us passionately about the disfigurement of the digital age and how we can try to fix it.

The post 52 Insights – Has Technology Failed Us? appeared first on Rushkoff.

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